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Swiss Seismological Service (SED)

The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) at ETH Zurich is the federal agency for earthquakes. Its activities are integrated in the federal action plan for earthquake precaution.

Felt Earthquakes in Switzerland

Local Time
Mag.
Location
Felt?
2016-12-03  10:01 3.6 Dijon F Probably not felt
2016-11-25  19:29 2.7 Sion VS Felt
2016-11-19  01:53 2.7 Singen D Slightly felt
2016-11-14  03:06 2.7 Singen D Probably not felt

Latest Earthquakes

Local Time
Magnitude
Location
2016-12-11 07:05 1.0 Buchs SG
2016-12-11 06:13 1.8 Vaduz FL
2016-12-11 03:11 1.8 Courmayeur I
2016-12-10 11:55 1.1 Sanetschpass VS

Swiss Earthquakes Counter

since 01.01.2016 
000

Recent earthquakes magnitude 4.5 or greater

Time (UTC)
Mag.
Region
2016-12-09 12:57:18 4.7 Adriatic Sea
2016-12-09 12:56:57 4.9 Northwestern Balkan reg
2016-12-03 21:04:32 4.8 Greece
2016-12-02 11:46:04 4.6 Southern Greece
2016-11-29 20:09:38 4.5 Poland
2016-11-29 00:19:25 4.9 Crete, Greece
2016-11-23 12:14:38 4.6 EASTERN TURKEY
2016-11-20 23:25:02 4.7 NORTH OF SVALBARD
2016-11-17 03:43:19 4.5 Iran-Iraq Border Region
2016-11-16 09:15:16 4.6 Greece
2016-11-10 12:12:40 4.8 Northwestern Balkan reg
2016-11-03 00:35:01 4.9 Central Italy
2016-11-02 22:24:05 4.5 Norwegian Sea

Recent earthquakes magnitude 6 or greater

UTC Time
Magnitude
Location
2016-12-10 16:24:36 6.1 Bougainville - Solomon Islands region
2016-12-09 19:10:07 6.9 Bougainville - Solomon Islands region
2016-12-08 21:56:07 6.5 Bougainville - Solomon Islands region
2016-12-08 17:38:46 7.8 SOLOMON ISLANDS
2016-12-08 17:38:46 7.8 Bougainville - Solomon Islands region
2016-12-08 17:38:21 6.9 Fiji region
2016-12-08 14:49:46 6.5 Off coast of northern California, United States
2016-12-06 22:03:32 6.5 Northern Sumatera, Indonesia
NEWS

11/21/2016

[German only] Erdbebenschwarm im Hegau (D)

Seit dem 22. Oktober 2016 ist im Hegau bei Singen (D), ca. 10 km nordöstlich von Schaffhausen, ein Erdbebenschwarm aktiv. Bis zum frühen Abend des 21. November hat der Schweizerische Erdbebendienst (SED) über 100 Mikroerdbeben dieses Schwarmes detektiert. Davon konnten 41 Beben mit Magnituden zwischen 0.2 und 3.0 lokalisiert werden. Gemäss manueller Auswertung lagen sie alle in einer Tiefe von ca. 7 km. Über 90 Beben waren so klein, dass sie nur durch Signalvergleiche detektiert aber nicht genauer lokalisiert werden konnten. Das bisher stärkste Beben ereignete sich am Morgen des 3. November und wurde in der Region deutlich verspürt. Auch die zwei Beben mit Magnitude 2.7 am 14. und 19. November und einige der schwächeren Beben wurden teilweise verspürt.

Die Analysen legen nahe, dass die Aktivität auf einer von Nordwest nach Südost gerichteten Störung liegt. Die Orientierung dieser Störungszone passt gut mit dem Verlauf des Hegau-Bodensee Grabens zusammen. Dieser ist Teil einer grossräumigen tektonischen Grabenstruktur, die sich vom Kaiserstuhl nordwestlich von Freiburg (D) bis zum Bodensee erstreckt, und die durch die tertiären und mesozoischen Sedimente vermutlich bis hinab ins Grundgebirge reicht.

Eine ähnliche Sequenz von Erdbeben war in unmittelbarer Nähe zwischen März 1995 und August 1996 aktiv. Auch damals erreichten die stärksten Beben eine Magnitude von 3. In der Region Schaffhausen ist statistisch gesehen etwa alle 400 bis 600 Jahre mit einem Beben der Magnitude 4.5 oder grösser zu rechnen (siehe Karten der Magnituden). Historisch sind in der Region allerdings keine Beben mit Magnituden von 5 und mehr bekannt. Trotzdem kann auch hier, wie überall in der Schweiz, ein grösseres Erdbeben prinzipiell jederzeit auftreten. Wie sich Auswirkungen und Schäden von Erdbeben verringern lassen, lesen Sie hier.

Erdbebenschwärme treten in der Schweiz immer wieder auf und können einige Tage bis mehrere Monate andauern. Vorhersagen lässt sich die Entwicklung eines Erdbebenschwarms genauso wenig wie das Auftreten einzelner Erdbeben. Erfahren sie hier mehr über Erdbebenschwärme.

11/13/2016

Major earthquake occurs in New-Zealand

Major earthquake occurs in New-Zealand

A major earthquake of magnitude around 7.8 struck New Zealand on Sunday 13th November at 12:02 CET (local time: midnight the day after) with an epicenter located 100 km north of Christchurch, about 200 km south of Wellington. The event propagated on several faults of the South Island (thrust and strike-slip), inducing a very complex rupture that initially confused the computation models of the seismological agencies.

The shaking was severe in Christchurch and Wellington where widespread non-structural damage has been reported (falling of false ceiling, chimneys, broken windows and furniture). Liquefaction has been observed in Wellington. No fatalities have been reported so far.

The region close to the faults that were activated is only sparsely populated.

A tsunami of 3 meters has been observed on the east coast of New-Zealand where an evacuation of the costal areas had been organized.

Large aftershocks occurred after the mainshock and will continue for several weeks to months, possibly generating more damage. On average, an event of this size occurs only once a year in the world.

11/12/2016

[French only] Très petit séisme étonnamment bien ressenti à Monthey

Un très petit séisme de magnitude 1.9 s’est produit samedi 12 novembre 2016 à 11:39 (heure locale) à Monthey (VS). Le foyer du séisme était situé très proche de la surface et dans une zone habitée (localité de Choex à Monthey), c’est pourquoi il a été perçu par de nombreuses personnes à Monthey et dans les communes limitrophes dont près de 40 l’ont signalé sur notre site. Il est très inhabituel qu’un si petit événement soit perçu par la population.  Le séisme a été plutôt perçu comme un bruit souterrain que comme une vibration. Le bruit est produit par le couplage entre les vibrations du sol et l’atmosphère.

D’autres événements similaires sont présents dans notre catalogue à cet endroit.

11/01/2016

From Blue to Red and Much More Besides: Introducing Our New Website

The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) has launched a new website – and there is much more to it than just a new look. In addition to the standard desktop site, a mobile version is now available; people using mobile devices are redirected instantly to the new mobile site, allowing them to access all the latest information from the SED, wherever they are and at any time. We have also revamped, enhanced, translated, and updated a lot of our online content, while the user guidance has also been optimized. Furthermore, our earthquake maps are now available to explore in an interactive format. This all became possible following the switch to a new content management system, after the previous system ceased to be operational.

We hope you enjoy exploring our new website and discovering more about the fascinating work we do here at the SED. Please let us know whether there are any aspects of our new site you think could be improved, and, of course, if there is anything in particular that you like.

Provide feedback on our new website: click here to access the questionnaire.

TOPICS

Earthquake

Help, the Earth Is Shaking!

Help, the Earth Is Shaking!

Earthquakes are inevitable, but the damage they may be expected to cause can be mitigated in relatively simple ways. Find out the recommended behaviour before, during and after a powerful earthquake.

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Knowledge

Earthquake Country Switzerland

Earthquake Country Switzerland

Switzerland experiences between 500 and 800 earthquakes a year, around 10 of which are powerful enough (with a magnitude of approximately 2.5 or higher) to be felt by the country's inhabitants. Find out more about the natural hazards with the greatest damage-causing potential in Switzerland.

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Alerting

Always Informed

Always Informed

If you want to be kept informed at all times, here you will find an overview of the various information services provided by the Swiss Seismological Service (SED).

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Knowledge

Earthquake Hazard

Earthquake Hazard

In Switzerland, earthquakes are the natural hazard with the greatest potential for causing damage. They cannot currently be prevented or reliably predicted. But, thanks to extensive research, much is now known about how often and how intensely the earth could shake at a given location in the future. Consult a variety of different maps using our interactive web tool to find out how likely certain earthquakes are in Switzerland.

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Research & Teaching

Fields of Research

Fields of Research

We are often asked what staff at the SED do when no earthquakes are occurring. The answer is they conduct research in a variety of fields, constituting SED's main scientific activities described in our research field section.

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About Us

Swiss Seismological Service (SED)

Swiss Seismological Service (SED)

The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) at ETH Zurich is the federal agency responsible for monitoring earthquakes in Switzerland and its neighboring countries and for assessing Switzerland’s seismic hazard. When an earthquake happens, the SED informs the public, authorities, and the media about the earthquake’s location, magnitude, and possible consequences. The activities of the SED are integrated in the federal action plan for earthquake precaution.

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Earthquakes

Earthquake Monitoring

Earthquake Monitoring

Around 10 times a year on average you will hear or read about an earthquake occurring in Switzerland. However, the vast majority of quakes recorded by the SED go unnoticed by the general public because they fall below the threshold of human perception and can only be detected by sensitive measuring devices. The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) operates a network of more than 150 seismic stations across Switzerland.

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Research and Teaching

Products and Software

Products and Software

Go to our Products page for access to seismic data and various apps.

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